ED 200 Week Ten Part 1 (Spring 2020)

Hi everyone,

Today is our last “You Choose” topic day. Today is also the last of the questions. So as soon as you are finished answering today’s questions, please send your Fifth Set of Responses my way. After today’s lesson I will have one final lecture that will give you a summary of our class.

So today I am asking you to choose one of the three documentaries. All three documentaries deal with high performing schools or classrooms. These classrooms might have significant language diversity, or be in neighborhoods with high crime or low income. Many student finding themselves in challenging environments are often ‘at-risk’ through no fault of their own. As you view the documentary of your choice, you will gain a better sense of how classroom environments can be shaped to help students in their educational pursuits.

If you choose the first documentary, The Hobart Shakespeareans, you will see a classroom of children reading and performing at a very high level. English is not these children’s first language.  You will also learn about some management strategies that do not rely on rules but rather on Kohlberg’s levels of moral development.

The second and third documentaries look at high-poverty, high-performing schools. The second looks into elementary classrooms, the third looks into middle and secondary classrooms.

 

As before, please choose one documentary. You will find the questions below the video you choose to watch.

 

 

Choice Number One:

The Hobart Shakespeareans: A Case Study in Exceptional Teaching Full Video (52:37)

DESCRIPTION
“There are no shortcuts,” says the banner at the front of Rafe Esquith’s fifth-grade classroom. Most of Esquith’s students come from low-income Mexican and Korean households in the neighborhood surrounding Hobart Boulevard Elementary, in Central Los Angeles—and his warning about shortcuts applies not just to young learners but to lazy teachers who can’t see a future for marginalized children. Esquith is so committed to his mission that he transforms his class into a yearlong adventure—empowering the kids to perform Hamlet and undergo countless other out-of-the-box experiences while still excelling on standardized tests. Filmed over several months among the Hobart Shakespeareans, as Esquith’s pupils have come to be known, this documentary explores their learning process and Esquith’s award-winning teaching methods. Disciplinary and security incidents, an extended field trip to Washington, DC, and visits from actors Michael York and Ian McKellan are only a few of the unforgettable passages on this grand educational voyage. (53 minutes)

 

 

Fifth Question Set 

Response Question 12: Please list five things that make this a ‘high-performing’ classroom.

Response Question 13: What are five things you could do as a future teacher to help create a classroom environment that is kind, just, and would help students achieve in school?

 

 

 

Choice Number Two:

Disrupting Poverty in the Elementary Classroom Full Video (01:10:16)

DESCRIPTION
Drawing upon their years studying high-poverty, high-performing schools, William Parrett and Kathleen Budge identify the common practices and structures that effective schools put into action as well as the unproductive processes these schools eliminate. This data forms the basis of their framework for action to help get all students learning to high standards. It’s not a one-size-fits-all approach. This program examines the critical components that set these institutions apart from their struggling peers, visiting schools where district leaders, school leaders, and teachers have found great success by improving practices, or eliminating what’s not working in the key areas of building leadership capacity; fostering a healthy, safe, and supporting learning environment; and focusing on student, professional, and system learning.

 

 

Fifth Question Set 

Response Question 12: Please identify the common practices and structures that effective schools put into action as well as the unproductive processes these schools eliminate.

Response Question 13: What are five things you could do as a future teacher to help create a classroom environment that is kind, just, and would help students achieve in school?

 

 

 

Choice Number Three:

Disrupting Poverty in the Secondary Classroom Full Video (01:06:39)

DESCRIPTION
What can you do to disrupt poverty in your school and turn it into a high-achieving school? In this program, William Parrett and Kathleen Budge look at secondary schools that are pushing impoverished students to high achievement. They identify the common practices and structures these schools put into action as well as the processes they eliminate and discuss how this data forms the basis of their framework for action designed to help schools get all students learning to high standards. The program visits a middle and high school where district leaders, school leaders, and teachers have found great success by improving practices in building leadership capacity; fostering a healthy, safe, and supporting learning environment; and focusing on student, professional, and system learning.

 

 

Fifth Question Set 

Response Question 12: Please identify the common practices and structures that effective schools put into action as well as the unproductive processes these schools eliminate.

Response Question 13: What are five things you could do as a future teacher to help create a classroom environment that is kind, just, and would help students achieve in school?

 

That’s it for the questions. Once you are finished answering these, you will be finished your Fifth (and last) Question Set. I look forward to receiving your work.

Only one more final lecture to go. Until then have a great week!