ED 200 Week Ten Part 1 (Fall 2020)

Hi everyone,

Today is our last “You Choose” topic day. We also have an Education Disposition Assessment form to complete. That will wrap up our questions.

So as soon as you are finished answering today’s questions, and going through the Educator Disposition Form, you will be able to send your Fifth Set of Responses my way. That will be it for the responses — Yahooooo!!!!!!!!

But wait, it says we have one more lecture on the syllabus!

Yes, that is true. After today’s lesson I will have one final lecture that will give you a summary of our class and let you know some of my feelings about teaching. And, if you include any questions at the end of the fifth response set,  I will try to answer them in my last summary lecture.

 

So today I am asking you to choose ONE of the three documentaries. All three documentaries deal with high performing schools or classrooms. These classrooms might have significant language diversity, or be in neighborhoods with high crime or low income. Many students in challenging environments are often ‘at-risk’ through no fault of their own. As you view the documentary of your choice, you will gain a better sense of how classroom environments can be shaped to help students in their educational pursuits.

If you choose the first documentary, The Hobart Shakespeareans, you will see a classroom of children reading and performing at a very high level. English is not these children’s first language.  You will also learn about some management strategies that do not rely on rules but rather on Kohlberg’s levels of moral development.

The second and third documentaries look at high-poverty, high-performing schools. The second looks into elementary classrooms, the third looks into middle and secondary classrooms.

 

As before, please choose one documentary. You will find the questions below the video you choose to watch.

 

Choice Number One:

The Hobart Shakespeareans: A Case Study in Exceptional Teaching Full Video (52:37)

DESCRIPTION
“There are no shortcuts,” says the banner at the front of Rafe Esquith’s fifth-grade classroom. Most of Esquith’s students come from low-income Mexican and Korean households in the neighborhood surrounding Hobart Boulevard Elementary, in Central Los Angeles—and his warning about shortcuts applies not just to young learners but to lazy teachers who can’t see a future for marginalized children. Esquith is so committed to his mission that he transforms his class into a yearlong adventure—empowering the kids to perform Hamlet and undergo countless other out-of-the-box experiences while still excelling on standardized tests. Filmed over several months among the Hobart Shakespeareans, as Esquith’s pupils have come to be known, this documentary explores their learning process and Esquith’s award-winning teaching methods. Disciplinary and security incidents, an extended field trip to Washington, DC, and visits from actors Michael York and Ian McKellan are only a few of the unforgettable passages on this grand educational voyage. (53 minutes)

 

Fifth Question Set 

Response Question 8: Please list five things that make this a ‘high-performing’ classroom.

Response Question 9: What are five things you could do as a future teacher to help create a classroom environment that is kind, just, and would help students achieve in school?

 

 

 

Choice Number Two:

Disrupting Poverty in the Elementary Classroom Full Video (01:10:16)

DESCRIPTION
Drawing upon their years studying high-poverty, high-performing schools, William Parrett and Kathleen Budge identify the common practices and structures that effective schools put into action as well as the unproductive processes these schools eliminate. This data forms the basis of their framework for action to help get all students learning to high standards. It’s not a one-size-fits-all approach. This program examines the critical components that set these institutions apart from their struggling peers, visiting schools where district leaders, school leaders, and teachers have found great success by improving practices, or eliminating what’s not working in the key areas of building leadership capacity; fostering a healthy, safe, and supporting learning environment; and focusing on student, professional, and system learning.

 

 

Fifth Question Set 

Response Question 8: Please identify the common practices and structures that effective schools put into action as well as the unproductive processes these schools eliminate.

Response Question 9: What are five things you could do as a future teacher to help create a classroom environment that is kind, just, and would help students achieve in school?

 

 

 

Choice Number Three:

Disrupting Poverty in the Secondary Classroom Full Video (01:06:39)

DESCRIPTION
What can you do to disrupt poverty in your school and turn it into a high-achieving school? In this program, William Parrett and Kathleen Budge look at secondary schools that are pushing impoverished students to high achievement. They identify the common practices and structures these schools put into action as well as the processes they eliminate and discuss how this data forms the basis of their framework for action designed to help schools get all students learning to high standards. The program visits a middle and high school where district leaders, school leaders, and teachers have found great success by improving practices in building leadership capacity; fostering a healthy, safe, and supporting learning environment; and focusing on student, professional, and system learning.

 

 

Fifth Question Set 

Response Question 8: Please identify the common practices and structures that effective schools put into action as well as the unproductive processes these schools eliminate.

Response Question 9: What are five things you could do as a future teacher to help create a classroom environment that is kind, just, and would help students achieve in school?

___________________________________________________

Response Question 10

Educator Disposition Assessment Instruction Sheet

Your final assignments for ED 200 is to complete a self-assessment on your own ‘professional dispositions’ that are a part of the requirements for becoming a licensed teacher. This is called the Educator Dispositions Assessment (EDA). Although not all of you will choose to pursue teacher licensure at WOU, I hope that ED 200 has introduced you to the expectations of professional educators. If you continue on the pathway towards becoming a licensed educator, each term your College of Education professors will submit an EDA for you at the end of term; these EDA scores will be a part of your application process for the ED program. As such, I want you to be familiar with the assessment and what it measures. Please follow the directions below carefully. This entire activity should take approximately 20-25 minutes to complete.

I want to make clear to you that by you doing this assessment, you are getting a chance to see what professors in the College of Education are looking for as far as potential teachers’ dispositions. As you have come to know from this class, teachers are expected to act in certain professional ways and have qualities that will help them and their students succeed. By filling out this assessment on your own, you will hopefully recognize areas of personal strength and areas you would like to improve on. I don’t grade your own assessment. So be honest in your assessment and keep a copy for yourself.

Here we go 🙂

Directions:

1) Here is a PDF of the assessment tool. You will need this:

EDA Assessment Tool

2) If you are able to print the EDA, you can ‘mark your scores’ on it as a first draft. If you are not able to print the EDA assessment tool, please use a sheet of paper and number from 1-9. You will be watching a video that describes each line of the rubric for the EDA.

As you watch the video, please self-score yourself on each rubric item. As a reminder: although completing the EDA is a requirement for ED 200, you are not graded on your assessment score. It is perfectly acceptable and likely accurate to NOT score yourself as completely proficient in each area. There is no penalty for ED 200 or for your later application to the ED program for self scoring yourself as having areas where continued growth is necessary (developing or needs improvement).

3) Watch this video that overviews the EDA Assessment tool. The link is below. As you watch, self score yourself either on the EDA tool or on your own sheet of paper. You can pause the video at any time to more closely read the indicators or to reflect on what self score you think is most appropriate. Some of the indicators will apply more directly once you are in a student teaching placement. But, you will have a good idea of some of the expectations others will have of you as you work through the Education program.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1kexwl1f6bZv60cnWWWhu5dX8Ax6avwbi/view

Click on this link for a captioned version of the video.

 

4) Finally, complete this survey link, and enter your self scores on the EDA Assessment tool here:

https://wou.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6L4SCJgtFzxYwN7

 

There, that was easy enough.

Fifth Question Set 

Response Question 10 (optional): If you have any questions that you would like me to address in my final lecture, please submit those as well. 

That’s it for the questions. Once you are finished answering your Fifth (and last) Question Set (up to question 9) and have finished your EDA Self Assessment, please send me your Fifth Question set. They are due Friday, December 4th, but feel free to email them to me as soon as you are finished. As always, I look forward to receiving your work and will get back to you with my own commentary.

Only one more final lecture to go. Until then have a great week!