ED 610 Week One (Fall 2022)

 

Hi Everyone,

Welcome to our ED 610, Unmaking the Adult Learner: Adult Education from Training to Empowered Possibility.

I will break today’s lecture into three parts. Part 1 will be an introduction to the class. Part 2 will be an introduction to the differences between pedagogy and andragogy. And, in Part 3 I will talk about your ‘Work In Progress’.

 

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Part 1

 

Let me start first by introducing myself, and then I will talk a bit about this course.

This is a short intro I created for one of my undergraduate classes. But I think it will give you a sense of who I am if we haven’t met before.

Transcript

Hey all, welcome to our Foundations of education class. Before we get started, I should briefly tell you about myself so that you know who is at this end.

My name is Dana Ulveland. My first name is Randall but I go by Dana. If you are wondering how to address me in your emails, you could refer to me as Dr. Ulveland, or professor Ulveland, or Dr. Dana, or Dana. That’s all fine.

I grew up in small rural town in central Alberta. Most of my recollections of childhood revolve around playing outside in the fields and forests, or down by the blindman river. I have lots of great school memories, and, many not so great memories. The good memories usually have to do with playing music in a variety of bands. Most of the not so good memories were in middle and high school. Though in high school, I did meet my wife, whom I am married to. That was a good memory.

Let’s see, as for jobs, before I started university I was a heavy equipment operator on a road crew, worked on the rigs in the oil patch in Northern Alberta, worked in a gas plant, did some carpentry work along the way. I guess it was working in 30 below weather on the rigs that I thought university might be a better sort of life. So, you are working on your degree here at WOU. This is a great university. I did my undergraduate work at the University of Alberta, majoring in philosophy and English. Then after studying French in Paris for a semester, I returned to the same university to get my degree in education. I taught elementary and junior high for five years. I did my graduate work at the University of Oregon, you know where that is of course, and I completed my Doctoral work at Simon Fraser University in British Columbia. Some of my students in the past competed in sporting events at SFU, so you might know where that is.

As for my research, my research was in, and continues to be in, the philosophy of education, language, technology and media. My initial interest in technology and media developed while using music technologies (MIDI synthesizers and sequencers) personally as a musician, and then in the classroom. When I was in high school I turned my parent’s basement into a recording studio. It began as a fairly modest endeavor (this was before the advent of digital recording equipment). I had an 8 track reel-to-reel tape recorder, sound board, mics, effects, etc.. At the time, all of this seemed very exciting. Of course, as is often the case, like any other musician, I wanted to be able to replicate what the big recording studios were doing. And it was difficult to replicate what major studios were doing because they had the money to bring in any type of musician to play any type of instrument. Plus, the major studios had some pretty impressive sounding synthesizers and sound samplers (all in about the $50,000 range, which in today’s money would be closer to $100,000). Anything I could afford was pretty limited in comparison. But, as you know, computer-based equipment started to take off. Synthesizers started to become affordable. The personal computer was marketed as something affordable. And, before long, it was easy to be sitting with a 64 track digital recording outfit. Anyway, enough reminiscing. Suffice it to say that I became interested in computer technologies through music.

While teaching in the public school system I was the computer coordinator of the school, and I developed one of the first electronic music labs for student composition and performance in the province of Alberta. After teaching for five years, and completing a Masters in Computers in Education at the University of Oregon, I began my Doctoral research at Simon Fraser University. My area of study focused on the ontology of technology and the human-educational implications that emerge through phenomenological analysis and existential examination. That’s a mouthful isn’t it? What that means is that I like to come to understand how people experience the world and how schooling and education plays into that. Eventually I moved to Alabama where I taught at Auburn University at Montgomery for three years. Finally I moved to Oregon and have been teaching here at WOU for twenty two years.

As for my hobbies: I am a pilot, a downhill skier, a scuba diver and a musician or sorts. I am always trying to learn new things, and right now I am trying to learn Chinese and continue to try to learn Spanish. More importantly, I am a husband to my high school sweetheart, and a father of two girls who are also in university. I am glad you are here. Welcome to the course.  

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Now, your turn. If you would, please email me (ulvelad@wou.edu) and tell me a bit about yourself. Please include “ED 610” in the subject heading. I would also love to hear why you are taking an adult education course. If I know your interests I can try to incorporate materials that might be of particular interest or use to you.

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Now, let me talk more about this class.

Is this the first online class you have had with me?

If you have taken any of my other online classes, you will know what to expect for the most part. This class will have some similarities — a little less philosophical, but the teaching and learning will be similar. In my philosophy-oriented classes, I try to create an environment where we wonder and ask a lot of questions. I normally develop a rather lengthy argument that is woven throughout the course, and then work through the argument with my students over the ten weeks. As I develop the argument I invite others to draw on their own experiences to refute or verify the various subcomponents of the main argument.

This class will be a bit different.

How do I envision this class? Well, of course, we are questioning the idea of adult learning. And in doing so we will try to come to some understanding as to what adult learning means, where the idea comes from historically, how it differs from pedagogy and some of the theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of andragogy. We do want to have a reasonable background in the context of andragogy. Perhaps more importantly, in an attempt to respect andragogical practices (that is adult learning) as it has been defined and articulated by others, we will try to put ourselves into an environment where you, the adult learner, become largely responsible for your own learning. This puts you in the driver’s seat so to speak. When this happens, my role changes also. I become more of a facilitator, trusting that you are learning what you want to learn. All of this will become a bit clearer as we put some of Knowles’ theory into practice.

The Appeal of Andragogy for Me

Perhaps some of the appeals of andragogy comes from working on my Ph.D. at Simon Fraser University. When I entered the doctoral program I was given my schedule of courses. There were four. Four courses to take. That didn’t seem like very many I thought. So I wondered why the average completion time for doctoral work was five years. That is when I came to understand that graduate work means coming up with new knowledge. New ideas. It is not simply re-stating other people’s already formed ideas. That is not to say that it isn’t important to know what other scholars’ ideas are. It is to say that there is an assumption that graduate work necessitates original thought. I also realized that new and innovative thinking requires the exploration of very unique contexts. So, I learned quickly that every graduate student was exploring very different areas–areas that weren’t even fully understood by other professors.

One of my committee members was Don Ihde. He is an expert in the philosophy of science and technology. He lived in another country on the other side of the continent. He was very influential in the work I was doing. And even though he was on my doctoral committee, I never actually met him in person. But I did read all of his books, and I did talk with him through email. When I read his books it was as if I could hear his voice. I heard his stories and his insights. These were not textbooks. These were writings that drew me in to consider new ideas. His teachings were not simply the dissemination of information (as many textbooks are designed to do). I was listening to ‘him’ through his writing. I have rarely found a textbook that felt like I was getting to personally know the author. Textbooks often feel disconnected, written for everyone and no one. But as I read Dr. Ihde’s books I felt as though he was talking to me — mentoring me — a role model for my own thinking. If I felt I needed to verify my own thinking or my new ideas, I would go off and read other research and philosophy that would help substantiate my own thinking. I found my own mentors, I talked to others when I was looking for answers, and I was exploring. I had autonomy. I was responsible for my own learning. I wasn’t doing busy work for anyone because I was responsible for my own learning. If I deemed my work to be busy-work, that was my own doing. I was on my own time schedule. And I learned the importance of seeking out others who might help me in my own academic pursuit. Grades had no bearing on my work. I either passed my comprehensive exams and dissertation defense or I didn’t. Nobody was standing over me saying if you don’t do this or that you will get docked 10 points.

So, this might give you some idea how I think of our relationship.

I don’t want to think of any of my graduate-level courses as ‘information’ courses. Undergraduate courses are more akin to ‘information’ courses. As undergraduates, we learn what others already know. But this course should be thought of as a course that gives us the opportunity to uncover aspects of experience that are not already apparent. We can learn what others have to say, and then branch off into our own pursuits. From the known to the unknown so to speak. When we are getting into those spaces where no one has been before, we are in graduate territory.

(This is Jim, working his way into graduate territory)

This is not a class where I am expecting you to memorize a lot of material and then be tested on it. In fact, testing can be thought of as a hindrance to andragogy. This is in part because this is a graduate-level class where we should be taking what we know about adult learners and apply that to ourselves and our future work. I don’t have a textbook with all the answers. If I am doing a good job as a graduate teacher I am encouraging you to ask questions that allow you to think into new ideas that have not yet been fully uncovered.

 

Course Expectations

What does this mean, then, for course expectations? If our goal were to accumulate a mass of information, then a demonstration of learning would be to show that you have amassed large masses of information and I would evaluate your accumulation accordingly. Now if you were a medical student removing an appendix or treating a kidney infection, I would want to be sure that you knew the difference between a kidney and an appendix. But this is not our purpose. If you were working on your pilot license I would want you to have very specific knowledge of the workings of aerodynamics, weather, and communication procedures. Flying an airplane in controlled airspace is not the time to be coming up with new innovative ideas on your own.

Of course, we do want to learn about adult learning from those who went before us. We might want to incorporate some of their insights and ideas. But, as a university graduate course, it is also our responsibility to come up with ‘new knowledge,’ ‘new ways of thinking,’ or ‘new ways of understanding’ within a particular field of study or domain of study. That is part of the Graduate School requirement.

We will accomplish these goals in three ways:

First: The Adult Learning Course Content

I will ask you to summarize and analyze some of the material I provide for you. This will account for the required content expected by the university. This will include a review of some of the foundational materials and ideas substantiating adult learning. We will review Malcolm Knowles’ seminal book (one that is available to us online in our ebrary account). I will also upload relevant chapters to this site, so you can read the material as we get to it.

*** A note: I have had students in the past buy the book on Amazon simply because they were tired of reading from a screen. I can see used sixth edition copies of the text on Amazon for as low as $10.00. However, you might we better off skimming the chapters that I share with you and spending your money on a more current Adult Learning book in your particular field of interest. I have chosen the Knowles text because this will provide you with the historical background of where our academic androgogical thinking came from.

**** A second note. Thinking of reading off of screens, I have mentioned to students in the past that they can increase the font size (text) by ‘zooming-in’ their browser screen.

So to recap, considering you might be pursuing a career in adult learning, we will try to understand some of the foundational aspects of andragogy as it relates to formal school settings. That is the reasoning behind using Malcolm Knowles’ book The Adult Learner.

Second: The Challenge

As an academic, it is rarely sufficient to simply learn what others have said about adult learning. This, I think, is where some of the fun begins. We question, challenge, and interpret some of the current discourse and develop our own ideas. I will try to lead the way here and articulate some of the ways the tradition has led us astray in our thinking given what we now know about the brain. I will invite you along with me into phenomenological analysis.  If you have taken my ED 632 class, some of this will be familiar territory.

Third: Your Content Creation AKA ‘Work In Progress’

You pursue your own line of exploration and begin to develop an instructional package (or curriculum, or resource) appropriate for adult learning.  We will refer to this as your own “work in progress.”  If you like, you can develop something for yourself. You pursue your own interests, satisfying your own reasons for pursuing adult education. So, if you are interested in health education, you might explore health education with the question, “How can I help other adults learn about health.” If you are interested in software development for adults, you might explore the related research in that area and begin to consolidate resources that could be used to aid in teaching the adult learner. If you are interested in teaching in a college or university, you might want to find out all you can to prepare yourself for a new job. If you are interested in creating community educational programs for seniors, you might examine the research that gives you a better understanding of the needs of the elderly. If you are interested in teaching yourself more about teaching online, for example, and you would like to develop your skills at working with Screenflow to teach your students, then teach yourself Screenflow. If you are interested in . . . . Obviously I could go on and on and on. Learn for yourself, don’t fall into the trap of doing work solely for someone else. Create your own intellectual journey.

What you do has to be meaningful and important (I guess if it is meaningful it is important 🙂 If you are working on a master’s thesis or master’s project, you might want to examine your ideas in terms of adult learning theory. Or, you might consider developing a presentation.

I will provide you with some content ideas that you might wish to explore in an attempt to save you some time.

I will ask that you share your ‘work in progress’ with me at the end of the term. I will speak to the project a bit more in Part Three of this lecture. It will make more sense to you after we understand some of the differences between pedagogy and andragogy.

So there we have it. The course requirements that help satisfy the university, graduate school, and our own adult learning expectations in three parts.

First: responses regarding the broad-based content.

Second: a challenge to the status quo.

Third: your own development of your own individualized explorations.

 

Responses: How should the responses look?

Each week I will ask that you summarize our course content based on questions I ask. In other words, I will ask you a few questions regarding the content and you provide your responses. I do my best to respect your own autonomy by trying to ensure my questions are open-ended. I will also try to ensure that you leave with an understanding of the theories that will give you expertise on adult learning (andragogy).

I will ask questions each week but will ask that you send your responses only two times during the term. That way I am able to create a rotation of assignments with my other classes. This will also give you some flexibility in how you work through the course content.

If you will, please copy the question I ask, paste the question in a word-processed document, and then provide your answer along with the question. I will highlight the questions in color so that they are easy to spot.

I am not a word counter, so don’t feel as though you need to write more than necessary. Think of the question/answer as a conversation — not an APA referenced paper.

Individual Exploration: How should this look?

A major purpose behind adult education is to have an adult interested in learning something and then going about that in a way that best suits the adults’ needs. Of course, there are andragogical methods that we will learn about that will help us design adult-based instruction. But I do want you to be in control of this so that you can apply some of what we learn about andragogy to yourself. I guess we could call it living the dream 🙂

In our next lesson, I will provide you with some ideas so that you can at least be thinking about your project (work in progress) right from the get-go.

 

But before we start thinking about projects, let’s get a better idea of what adult learning entails — at least what some theorists believe it entails.

Let’s wrap up our first introductory class with a look and andragogy, and the differences between andragogy and pedagogy.

 

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Part Two

 

Enough with the formalities. Let’s start digging into Adult Education

 

(This is Sam digging into Adult Learning)

 

 Let’s begin by exploring the concept of Andragogy

So, let us begin. Let’s begin by gaining a broad understanding of how adult learning is defined. This will be valuable to us regarding our teaching context. If we are developing curriculum or instructional practices for adults, knowing some of the theories in place might help us develop better instructional contexts. If we find ourselves going for a job interview where we will be teaching adults, knowing the differences between andragogy and pedagogy will show that we are well versed in the differences that might apply to teaching adults versus children.

Just a head’s-up, here your first response question that I have regarding the videos:

First Response Set:

Question One: Please summarize the difference between pedagogy and andragogy. In your summary please include the principles articulated in Malcolm Knowles’ Theory of Adult Learning. Finally, what does all of this mean to you as an adult educator or as an adult student?

Your response doesn’t have to be lengthy (certainly no more than a page) — point form if you like. I am more concerned with what you learn than the quantity you produce. Use this activity to help you put these ideas into your own words so that you can talk or write about them.

I put this question upfront before I share the videos. I will restate it again after the videos.

 

Andragogy (Adult Learning)

 

Pedagogy vs. Andragogy

Here is a short presentation by Lawaune Netter. I really like the way she compares andragogy and pedagogy. This makes it easy to see some of the differences between the two.

 

 

 

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Now A Word About The Following Clips

For the following video clips, you will have to log in to the clip using your WOU login and password.

In this video, we will learn about some of the challenges adult learners have as well as some of their advantages over younger learners. We will also hear how we can develop the most appropriate environments for adult learners. We will get another review of Malcolm Knowles’s theory, and hear what the theory says about three styles of learning.

Click on the Adult Learning title or the image below to go straight to the documentary in WOU’s Films on Demand.

Adult Learning 1: Principles Full Video (17:26)

 

DESCRIPTION

Learning is a lifelong activity. Without realizing it, adults continually learn throughout their lives in an informal way. However as the population ages, and the nature of jobs and work change, educators need to address the perceived barriers faced by many adult learners in more formal situations. This program introduces the key principles of adult learning, including learning styles and some specific difficulties faced by older individuals. By understanding the barriers adult learners face, facilitators can help unlock potential advantages, decrease barriers to adult learning, and take advantage of the methods available to best engage and support adults in their ongoing education.

 

Adult Learning 2: Styles

In this clip we hear more about learning styles. I should mention that the idea of learning styles is contentious. While it sounds reasonable, the initial research was highly flawed and has since been debated. Nevertheless, we don’t need to discount the idea of learning styles — yet — and we can look into the idea further in a future lecture when we spend some time examining how neurons are wired together in the brain.,

DESCRIPTION

Learning is part of life. We learn many different things in a variety of ways. For educators, it is all about finding the most effective learning styles for each individual to achieve success in the teaching environment. This program describes three main learning styles—visual, auditory and kinesthetic—and the four personality types that all individuals display, including activists, reflectors, theorists, and pragmatists. It provides concrete examples of the main styles and encourages all educators to learn more about the composition of their classes. By making the effort to cater for different styles of individual adult learners and varying teaching techniques, teachers and students can experience successful learning outcomes.

 

 

Adult learning 3: Inclusive Practices

DESCRIPTION

In the face of increasing levels of diversity, educators are grappling to create and maintain inclusive learning cultures and environments. As facilitators of learning, we must develop awareness of, and respond to, the diversity of our learners. This program provides an introduction to inclusive learning by exploring strategies that promote diversity and support inclusion. We also discover how organizations can improve the workplace through encouraging a positive learning culture and adopting inclusive learning practices. Through implementing inclusive learning practices, educators and trainers can provide learning and assessment that embraces and encourages diversity in the learning environment.

 

 

Keeping inclusivity and diversity in mind, let me share with you this next short clip regarding non-traditional students.

 

Personalized Learning’ Can Put College In Reach For Non-Traditional Students

Finally for the clips. We know all this already, but sometimes someone different giving a review helps.

 

Working with Adult Learners

 

 

There we have it. We can now talk about some of the differences between pedagogy and andragogy. If we were being interviewed for a job and were questioned about adult learning, we have a great basis for a solid answer. If we plan on creating a curriculum or teaching adult learners we have a great place to begin our thinking in developing our craft. If we are working on a graduate project or thesis that has anything to do with adult learning, we have some initial resources for our literature review.

 

Response Question

If you recall: Each week I will ask that you respond to questions regarding course content. In other words, I will ask you a few questions regarding the content and you provide your responses. I will ask questions each week but will ask that you send your responses only two times during the term. That way I am able to create a rotation of assignments with my other classes.

I ask that you email your responses to me sometime during the ‘submission week’. You will find these dates on the syllabus.

I also ask that you attach a pdf, word, or pages document of your responses to the email that you send me. Also, please include “ED 610 Responses” in the subject heading. Thanks.

I ask that you email me this set sometime during the fourth week of class.

Here is the question again:

First Response Set:

Question One: Please summarize the difference between pedagogy and andragogy. In your summary please include the principles articulated in Malcolm Knowles’ Theory of Adult Learning. Finally, what does all of this mean to you as an adult educator or as an adult student?

Your response doesn’t have to be lengthy (certainly no more than a page) — point form if you like. I am more concerned with what you learn than the quantity you produce. Use this activity to help you put these ideas into your own words so that you can talk or write about them.

 

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Part Three

Now that we are getting a sense of what Andragogy is, let me repeat here what I said earlier about your final project.

If there is one thing that we have to respect when it comes to adult learning, it is that adults have to have control of their learning. This is difficult for many people, perhaps teachers more than most. As teachers, we have become very accustomed to controlled environments and we are very influenced by pedagogical methodologies. As teachers, we have been taught to control children and the discourse. Unfortunately, as you have probably found, pedagogical methodology has filtered into colleges and universities and is still applied to adults.

When I think of all the times I learned the most, remembered the most, and engaged the most, it was when I was doing what really interested me — when I was learning what was important and meaningfully to me. I want to extend that to you as well. So, your Work In Progress should be for you, not for me (even though you will share it with me).

I called this your “Work in Progress” because interesting academic work is rarely finished. And I think that working professionals such as yourselves, also taking graduate classes, and perhaps also taking care of family members, need more time to settle into the exploration of new ideas. For me, if I have a project that has to be finished in eight weeks and I feel the pressure of timelines, I begin going through the motions — doing things to simply get them done. And then by the end I say, “thank goodness that is finished.” That’s sad. What a waste. I would rather you say, at the end of our 10 weeks, that you are well on your way to exploring something exciting for yourself and you can’t wait to continue even though the class is over.

There is a book that was written by Neil Postman and Charles Weingartner called Teaching as a Subversive Activity. If you are in the Info-Tech Program you might know of Neil Postman’s book Technopoly. Anyway, they say something important about objectives that ring true to me. They list them as follows:

Postman and Weingartner’s Objectives:

To find joy in our work.

To increase our capacity to learn.

To increase our confidence in our ability to learn.

To develop our ability to inquire and wonder.

To recognize our own uniqueness as learners.

To try to sense and understand the universals in the human condition ultimately enhancing our ability to draw closer to other people.

I would rather your experience of your Work In Progress reflect these objectives than the knowledge objectives that typically prevail in course syllabi as required by the university. I would rather a partially completed project where you say, “I think I am on to something really interesting” than a completed project that was really something that was simply done for a grade.

But what if you try something innovative or creative and I don’t like it? What if you read something that is meaningful to you but I don’t see the relevance? 

That’s pedagogy and control talking. That’s a pedagogical way of thinking. The teacher says what is important. The teacher knows best. The teacher will determine the value of the students’ work. The teacher doesn’t trust the student to find joy in their work, increase their capacity to learn, to inquire and wonder, to know what makes them unique. There we have the control mechanisms and authority as it prevails in our schooling systems. We have to overcome that thinking to understand andragogy.

You grade your own final project based on Postman’s and Weingartner’s objectives

So I will ask that you grade your own final project based on Postman’s and Weingartner’s objectives. This way you don’t have to worry that trying to find joy might lead to a lousy grade.

What sorts of Works in Progress? Here are some ideas 🙂

A book review, or book reviews, or article reviews. 

I have a book sitting on my bookshelf. It is called Understanding Computers and Cognition by Winnograd and Flores. I was taking a class at the U of O during my Master’s degree and the professor said that we could pick a book that related to the class in some way, that would hopefully challenge us. That was the book I picked. It probably took me three or four years before I really understood it. But I kept coming back to it. And in the end, the book was instrumental in my own academic development. Had the instructor of the course tested me on the book, I would have failed miserably. Rather I was able to achieve every single objective Postman and Weingartner put forth.

You can find a book related to adult education that you think would be of value to you. Hopefully somewhat challenging and thought-provoking, and interesting! I will provide some book examples that you might find interesting in our next lecture.

A Workshop

You might be interested in developing a Workshop on Adult Learning. Your workshop could be real or imagined. By putting together a workshop, I am sure you would consolidate many of the main ideas regarding Adult Learning. You would organize your own thoughts, develop your ideas, speak to research, and be well prepared to sit for an interview in the event you wanted to get a job teaching adults. You could focus on a particular area, or develop a workshop more broadly.

Here is an example of a workshop that is designed to teach teachers about adolescents. It might give you an idea as to how you might put a workshop together. This file is compressed, so it will probably download to your computer and then you will have to decompress it. I wasn’t able to load the file without compressing it.

Teaching The Adolescent Brain Workshop*.pdf

You Teach Yourself Something That Interests You

Given that you are an adult learner, developing a background in teaching adults, you might like to take the opportunity to learn something by incorporating some of the things you learn from this class. I have had students choose quite a variety of topics in the past. Programming, photography, business, a second language, to name just a few different topics. Next lecture I will share with you a wide variety of topic ideas that I have been able to compile material that you might like to pursue.

Developing an Instructional Package for Adult Learners

You might find it of value to develop an instructional package (or curriculum, or resource) appropriate for adult learning. Perhaps you are a school specialist and would like to develop something for teachers or parents. Perhaps you are the technology coordinator and would like to develop something for those you work with. Perhaps you are a language teacher or an art teacher who . . . . . . you probably get the idea.

Exploring A Topic Relevant To Your Master’s Thesis, Master’s Project, Or Topic of Interest

If you are working on a master’s thesis or master’s project, you might want to examine your ideas in terms of adult learning theory. There are many topics to explore. If, for example, you are interested in health education, you might explore health education with the question, “How can I help other adults learn about health.” If you are interested in software development for adults, you might explore the related research in that area and begin to consolidate resources that could be used to aid in teaching the adult learner. If you are interested in teaching in a college or university, you might want to find out all you can to prepare yourself for a new job. If you are interested in creating community educational programs for seniors, you might examine the research that gives you a better understanding of the needs of the elderly. If you are interested in teaching yourself more about teaching online (for example, if you would like to develop your skills at working with Screenflow to teach your students, then teach yourself Screenflow). If you are interested in . . . . Obviously I could go on and on and on. Learn for yourself, don’t fall into the trap of doing work solely for someone else. Create your own intellectual journey.

Consider Ways To Incorporate Andragogical Methodology Into Children’s Learning Environments

I have had students in the past teaching students of all ages say that many of the methods deemed appropriate for adults are also appropriate for youngsters.

I have had a student learn a new computer programming language. One of my previous students finally took the time to learn to play the piano. One of my students created a workshop for their family business.

Next lecture I will provide you with some content that you will be free to explore in an attempt to save you some time should you be looking for some project ideas.

When do we submit our final Work In Progress?

I will ask that you share your ‘work in progress’ with me during week eleven. If you ever feel as though you would like to run any of your ideas by me, please don’t hesitate to send me an email.

 

That is enough for today. I hope all of this makes sense. I hope you are enjoying thinking about adult learning.

Oh yes, please don’t forget to send me a quick email about yourself. Just about you, not your response questions 🙂 Thanks!

 

Until next day, have a great week!