Who I Am

Hi,

For those of you interested, let me briefly tell you about myself so that you know who is at this end. My name is Randall Dana Ulveland. Even though my first name is Randall, I go by Dana.  I did my undergraduate work at the University of Alberta, majoring in philosophy and English. Taught elementary and junior high for five years. Did my graduate work at the University of Oregon and Doctoral work at Simon Fraser University in British Columbia. My research was in, and continues to be in, the philosophy of education, technology and media.

My initial interest in technology and media developed while using music technologies (MIDI synthesizers and sequencers) personally and in the classroom. When I was in high school I turned my parent’s basement into a recording studio. It began as a fairly modest endeavor (this was before the advent of digital recording equipment). I had an 8 track reel-to-reel tape recorder, sound board, mics, etc.. At the time, all of this seemed pretty exciting. Of course, it was difficult to replicate what major studios were doing because they had the money to bring in any type of musician to play any type of instrument. Plus, the major studios had some pretty impressive sounding synthesizers and sound samplers (all in about the $50,000 range, which in today’s money would be closer to $100,000). Anything I could afford was pretty limited in comparison. But, as you know, computer-based equipment started to take off. Synthesizers started to become affordable. The personal computer was marketed as something affordable. And, before long, it was easy to be sitting with a 64 track digital recording outfit. Anyway, enough reminiscing. Suffice it to say that I became interested in computer technologies through music.

I taught for a number of years in the public school system, and maintained my technology interest as a teacher. I was the computer coordinator of the school, and I developed one of the first electronic music labs for student composition and performance in the province.

After teaching for five years, and completing a Masters in Computers in Education at the University of Oregon, I began my Doctoral research at Simon Fraser University. My area of study focused on the ontology of technology and the human-educational implications that emerge through phenomenological analysis and existential examination. That’s a mouthful isn’t it? What that means is that I like to come to understand how people really experience the world and the role that schooling and education plays into that.

Eventually I moved to Alabama where I taught at Auburn University at Montgomery, Alabama, for three years. Finally I moved to Oregon and have been teaching here for twenty one years.

PROFESSIONAL PRESENTATIONS

 

 

Ulveland, R. D. (2018), From Hegel to Hebb: What Neuronal Cell Assemblies Might Have to Say About Our Dangerous Times, The Asian Conference of Education, Tokyo, Japan, October 13 – 15, 2018

 

Ulveland, R. D. (2017), Living in the Anthropocene: Eco-Phenomenological Dwelling, International Society for Phenomenology and Media, 18th Annual Conference, Brussels, Belgium March 15 – 17, 2017

 

Ulveland, R. D. (2016), Scientific Management and the Dissolution of Liberatory Perfection, Critical Questions in Education Symposim, Salt Lake City, Utah, Oct. 3 – 4, 2016

 

 

Ulveland, R. D. (2016),The Ontology of Efficiency and Scientific Management. Society for Phenomenology and Media: 17thAnnual International Conference, Puebla Mexico.

 

 

Ulveland, R. D. (2015),Modes of Being: Contrasting American Education and Finnish Educational Practices. Critical Questions in Education Conference: The Academy for Educational Studies, San Diego, California.

 

 

Ulveland, R. D. (2015),From the Theoretical to the Ontological: Finding Significance in the Referential Whole. Society for Phenomenology and Media: 16th Annual International Conference, San Diego, California.

 

 

Ulveland, R. D. (2013),From Comportment to Mirror Neurons: One With The Other. Society for Phenomenology and Media: 15thAnnual International Conference, Puebla Mexico.

 

 

Ulveland, R. D. (2012),From Mirror Neurons to Comportment: The Role of Motor Learning in Second Language Acquisition. The Asia Conference on Language Learning ACLL. Osaka, Japan.

 

 

Ulveland, R. D. (2011), Poetic Advertizing: Listening Toward the Hyper-Cultural. The Society for Phenomenology and Media 13th International Conference. Freiburg, Germany.

 

 

Ulveland, R. D. (2010),The Sound of Falling: Excursions into Heideggerian Concepts Through The Analysis of Sound. Society for Phenomenology and Media: 12thAnnual International Conference, Puebla Mexico.

 

Ulveland, R. D. (2009),Eco-phenomenology: The Language of Dwelling. 10th International JTEFS/BBCC Conference, Daugavpils, Latvia.

 

Ulveland, R. D. (2008), Heideggerian Insights into Postmodern Education, Society for Phenomenology and Media: 10thAnnual International Conference, Puebla Mexico.

 

Ulveland, R.D. (2005). Presencing, and the Medium of Distance Within the Ontic Relationship,  Paper presented at the 7thAnnual Society for Phenomenology and Media Conference, Cannon Beach, Oregon.

 

Ulveland, R.D. (2005). New Course in Teacher Prep. Poster Session, Western Oregon University

 

Ulveland, R.D. (2004). Media and the Spiritual Abyss,  Paper presented at the 6thAnnual Society for Phenomenology and Media Conference, Provo, Utah.

 

Ulveland, R.D. (2003). Mobile Communication; The Call of Mobility, Paper presented at the  5thAnnual Society for Phenomenology and Media Conference, Helsinki, Finland.

 

Ulveland, R.D. (2000).Sharing Accountability for Preparing Effective Teachers: Teaching, Integration, and Modeling–The Question of Philosophy,  Paper presented at the AACTE 2000 Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL.

 

Ulveland, R.D. (2000). The Loss of Language in Educational Technology Discourse, Invited presentation for the Education faculty, University of Calgary, Alberta.

 

Ulveland, R.D. (1997).The Educational Insignificance of Technological Attendere: Listening Toward a New Educational Discourse,  Paper presented at the Education Technology: Asking the Right Questions International Conference, Penn State, Pennsylvania.

 

Ulveland, R.D. (1997).The Educational Insignificance of Technological Attendere,  Paper presented at the Sixteenth Annual International Human Sciences Conference, Trondheim, Norway.

 

Ulveland, R.D. (1997). What is the Internet?Invited presentation for the Lions Club International Youth Program, Auburn University Montgomery Educational Forum, Montgomery, AL.

 

Ulveland, R.D. (1997). The Language of Technology: Listening Toward a New Educational Discourse, Presentation for the Education faculty, University of Alberta, Alberta.

 

Ulveland, R.D. (1997). Internet as a Means of Course Delivery: Lessons Learned,  Invited presentation for faculty, students and general public hosted by the Auburn University Montgomery Education Forum, Auburn University Montgomery Educational Forum, Montgomery, AL.

 

Ulveland, R.D. (1997). Teaching on the Net: Course Development and Maintenance,   Invited presentation hosted by Auburn University Montgomery Teaching Effectiveness Committee, Auburn University Montgomery, AL.

 

Ulveland, R.D. (1992). Music Continuity Central Alberta First Year Teachers’ Conference, Red Deer, Alberta

 

Ulveland, R.D. (1991).Computer-Based Music Technology in the Classroom, Invited presentation at the Northern Central Teachers’ Convention, Edmonton, Alberta.

 

Ulveland, R.D. (1990). Music Education: The High-Tech Classroom,  Invited presentation for the County of Lacombe Board of Education, Lacombe, Alberta

 

Ulveland, R.D. (1990). The Use of Technology to Enhance Program Continuity, Invited presentation at the A.T.A.C.C. Convention, Calgary, Alberta

 

PUBLICATIONS

 

 

Ulveland, R. (2018). “Poetic Language: Eco-Phenomenological Dwelling,” Proceedings of the Society for Phenomenology and Media, Vol. 5.

 

 

Ulveland, R. (2017). “Revisiting McLuhan: Pedagogy and the Ontology of Efficiency and Scientific Management,” Glimpse, Vol. 18.

 

Dantas-Whitney, M. , Ulveland, R. (2016). Problematizing Assumptions, Examining Dilemmas, and Exploring Promising Possibilities in Culturally Relevant Pedagogy. A Response to “’I Didn’t See It as a Cultural Thing’: Supervisors of Student Teachers Define and Describe Culturally Responsive Supervision”. Democracy and Education, 24 (1), Article 9.

 

 

Ulveland, R. D. (2015), From the Theoretical to the Ontological: Finding Significance in the Referential Whole. Glimpse: Phenomenology and Media, Volume 16

 

 

Ulveland, R. D. (2013), From Comportment to Mirror Neurons: One With The Other. Glimpse: Phenomenology and Media, Volume 15

 

 

Ulveland, R. D. (2012), From Mirror Neurons to Comportment: The Role of Motor Learning in Second Language Acquisition. The Asia Conference on Language Learning ACLL. Conference Proceedings, 2012.

 

 

Ulveland, R. D. (2011), Poetic Advertizing: Listening Toward the Hyper-Cultural. Glimpse: Phenomenology and Media, Volume 13, 2011. pp. 137-140

 

Ulveland, R. D. (2010), Mobile Communication: The Call of Mobility. In P. Majkut and A. Carrillo Canán (Eds. ). Phenomenology and Media: An Anthology of Essays from Glimpse / Society for Phenomenology and Media. Zeta Books

 

Ulveland, R. D. (2009), Phenomenology of Education for Sustainable Development, Eco-phenomenology: The Language of Dwelling. 7th International JTEFS/BBCC Latvia Proceedings, Institute of Sustainable Education, Daugavpils University, Latvia.

 

Ulveland, R.D. (2005). Editor’s Introduction,GLIMPSE: Conference Proceedings, The Society for Phenomenology and Media, San Diego, CA. Vol. 7, pp. 2-3.

 

Ulveland, R.D. (2005). Presencing,GLIMPSE: Conference Proceedings, The Society for Phenomenology and Media, San Diego, CA. Vol. 7, pp.

 

Ulveland, R.D. (2005). Media and the Absence of Spiritual Ways,GLIMPSE: The Society for Phenomenology and Media, San Diego, CA. Vol. 6, pp. 67-71.

 

Ulveland, R.D. (2004). Mobile Communication, The Call of Mobility,GLIMPSE: The Society for Phenomenology and Media, San Diego, CA. Vol. 5, pp. 39-44.

 

Ulveland, R.D. (Summer, 2003), Team Teaching and the Question of Philosophy, Education, California: Project Innovation, Vol 123, No. 4, pp. 659-662.

 

Ulveland, R.D. (Winter, 2000), Educational Revealing, Journal of Thought, Northern Illinois University: Caddo Gap Press, Volume 35, Number 4, pp. 31-42.

 

Ulveland, R.D. (April, 1998).The Educational Insignificance of Technological Attendere: Listening Toward a New Educational Discourse,Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society, Pennsylvania: Sage Publications, Volume 18, Number 1, pp. 7-15.

 

Ulveland, R.D. (July, 1998), Electronic Instruments–Played or Used?,Music Educators Journal, Vol. 85, No. 1, pp. 29-31, 41.

 

Ulveland, R.D. (Winter, 1997), Educational Dwelling,Journal of Thought, Northern Illinois University: Caddo Gap Press, Volume 32, Number 4, pp. 7-21.

 

Ulveland, R.D. (1996)  The Educational Insignificance of Technological Attendere. Dissertation, Simon Fraser University: Burnaby, British Columbia.

 

Ulveland, R.D. MIDI For the Classroom: A Keyboard Lab Program for Elementary and Junior High Students, Roland Music Educators Update, Vol. II, No. 4, Roland Canada Music Ltd.: Richmond, B.C.